Professor Jennifer Ross received her bachelor's degree in physics and
mathematics from Wellesley College in 2000. She went on to graduate school at the
University of California, Santa Barbara where she worked on the biophysics of
microtubules. 

After completing her doctoral work in 2004, Dr. Ross joined the labs of Yale Goldman and
Erika Holzbaur at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine to pioneer single
molecule work on the motor protein cytoplasmic dynein. 

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Microtubule-severing enzymes at the cutting edge (with David J. Sharp), Journal of Cell Science (2012)

ATP-dependent severing of microtubules was first reported in Xenopus laevis egg extracts in 1991. Two...

 

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Dynamic reorganization of Eg5 in the mammalian spindle throughout mitosis requires dynein and TPX2 (with Alyssa Gable, Minhua Qui, Janel Titus, Sai Balchand, Nick P. Ferenz, Nan Ma, Elizabeth S. Collins, Carey Fagersrom, Ge Yang, and Patricia Wadsworth), Molecular Biology of the Cell (2012)

Kinesin-5 is an essential mitotic motor. However, how its spatial–temporal distribution is regulated in mitosis...

 

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The impacts of molecular motor traffic jams, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA (2012)

Much of a modern person's day is spent trying to get from point A to...

 

Drosophila Katanin-60 Depolymerizes and Severs at Microtubule Defects (with David J. Sharp, Dong Zhang, Megan Bailey, Margaret M. Morelli, and Juan Daniel Díaz-Valencia), Journal of Cell Biology (2011)

Microtubule (MT) length and location is tightly controlled in cells. One novel family of MT-associated...

 

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Loop formation of microtubules during gliding at high density (with Lynn Liu and Erkan Tuzel), JOURNAL OF PHYSICS: CONDENSED MATTER (2011)

The microtubule cytoskeleton, including the associated proteins, forms a complex network essential to multiple cellular...