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A comparative study of the effects of training on emotional intelligence

J P. Murray
P J. Jordan
N M. Ashkanasy

Abstract

The training of emotional intelligence in organisations is the subject of much discussion. Ever since the construct first began to gain attention in the early 1990’s academics and practitioners alike have shown great interest, and have debated whether the skills and abilities of emotional intelligence can be learned. As this debate continues, organisations continue to invest millions of dollars in emotional intelligence training programs that propose to increase the emotional intelligence and overall workplace performance of individuals.

The purpose of this research is to compare two differing training programs and their effects on the emotional intelligence of participants. The first training program comprised of basic interpersonal skills including supportive communication, conflict resolution and goal setting skills. The second intervention on the other hand, focused on specific behavioural, relational and emotional skills and abilities.

The results of the study showed that while basic interpersonal skills training did increase performance, the overall emotional intelligence of participants did not increase. However, the interventions that focused specifically on behavioural, relational and emotional skills and abilities did lead to increases in the emotional intelligence of participants. These results provide significant implications for the construction and future development of emotional intelligence training interventions within organisations.

© Copyright UQ Business School, 2004

Suggested Citation

J P. Murray, P J. Jordan, and N M. Ashkanasy. "A comparative study of the effects of training on emotional intelligence" Paper presented at the 2nd Brisbane symposium on emotions and worklife. Brisbane, Australia. Nov. 2004.

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