Chuen-Fung Wong is an Assistant Professor of Music at Macalester College, where he
teaches ethnomusicology and world music. He received his Ph.D. in 2006 from the
University of California, Los Angeles, and he holds a Master of Philosophy degree from
the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His scholarly efforts have focused on the music of
Central Asia, East Asia, and the Middle East, attending to issues of musical
modernization, minority identification, and cosmopolitan belongings. He has conducted
ethnographic research on traditional and popular music of the Uyghur, Central Asian
Turkic-speaking Muslims who live for the most part in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
in northwest China. In addition to Central Asian music, Wong maintains a strong scholarly
interest in various Chinese traditions, particularly the seven-string zither ch’in (or
qin), of which he is a performer. Courses he has taught at Macalester College include
World Music, Introduction to Ethnomusicology, Music of Central Asia and the Middle East,
Western Music of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, and Music Appreciation. 

EDUCATION: B.A., M. Phil., Chinese University of Hong Kong Ph.D., University of
California, Los Angeles 

Article

OpenURL

Ritual and Music in North China, Journal of Chinese Religions (2009)
 

OpenURL

Ritual and Music of North China: Shawm Bands in Shanxi, Journal of Chinese Religions (2009)
 

Contributions to Books

Link

Listening to the Musical China, Listening to Chinese Music (2009)
 

Performances

Solo qin zither lecture-recital, Tanz- und Folkfest Rudolstadt (TFF), Germany (2012)

The annual Tanz- und Folkfest Rudolstadt is the largest world music festival in Germany

 

Solo qin zither performance, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minnesota (2012)
 

PDF

Conflicts, Occupation, and Music-Making in Palestine, Macalester International (2009)
 

Unpublished Papers

The Power of Silk String in Contemporary Guqin Music Activity, 37th World Conference of the International Council for Traditional Music: Conference contributions--Abstracts (2004)
 

Book Review