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Salivary cortisol responsivity to an intravenous catheter insertion in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Ann Marie McCarthy, University of Iowa
K. Hanrahan
L. M. Scott
N. Zemblidge
Charmaine Kleiber, University of Iowa
M. B. Zimmerman

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare salivary cortisol baseline levels and responsivity as well as behavioral distress to intravenous (IV) catheter insertions in 4- to 10-year-old children with (n = 29) and without (n = 339) attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHODS: This is a secondary data analysis from a sample of 542 children who participated in a multisite study on distraction. Data included were demographic variables, Pediatric Behavior Scale-30, Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress-Revised, and four salivary cortisol samples. RESULTS: Home samples from the ADHD group revealed nonsignificant but higher cortisol levels than the non-ADHD group. However, on the clinic day, the ADHD group had significantly lower cortisol levels before (0.184 vs. 0.261, p = .040) and 20-30 min after IV insertion (0.186 vs. 0.299, p = .014) compared with the non-ADHD group. CONCLUSIONS: Cortisol levels in children with and without ADHD differ in response to the stress of an IV insertion.

Suggested Citation

Ann Marie McCarthy, K. Hanrahan, L. M. Scott, N. Zemblidge, Charmaine Kleiber, and M. B. Zimmerman. "Salivary cortisol responsivity to an intravenous catheter insertion in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder" Journal of Pediatric Psychology (2011).
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/charmaine_kleiber/24

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