Dean Andrew L. Abrams joined the Charleston School of Law in 2005, after nearly
twenty years of teaching legal studies and serving as the Vice President for Legal
Affairs at the College of Charleston. During his tenure at the College of Charleston,
Dean Abrams held many titles including: Senior Vice President for Strategic Planning and
Administration (2003-2005); Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs
(2001-2003); Associate Provost (1999-2000); Senior Vice President for Institutional
Research and Planning (1992-2000); Chair, Department of Accounting and Legal Studies;
Associate Provost; Acting Dean of Graduate Studies (1991-1992); Director of the
Governor’s School of South Carolina (1991-1999); and Executive Athletic Director
(1988-1992). 

At the Charleston School of Law, Dean Abrams serves as the Executive Director of the
Charleston School of Law Foundation and Professor of Law. He accepted the position as
Dean of the Charleston School of Law after serving as Interim Dean during the 2008 Spring
Semester. 

Dean Abrams graduated Magna Cum Laude from Furman University with a degree in Political
Science and is an honors graduate of the University of South Carolina Law School. Dean
Abrams received an LL.M. from the University of Virginia Law School and a Certificate
from the Institute of Educational Management from Harvard University. 

Articles

"Arbitration and Punitive Damages" (with Gary Tidwell), South Carolina Business and Economic Review (1995)
 

"ADA:Take Two", South Carolina Business and Economic Review (1994)
 

"Health Care Professionals", South Carolina Business and Economic Review (1994)
 

"The Family Medical Leave Act of 1993", South Carolina Business and Economic Review (1993)
 

"Whistleblowers", South Carolina Business and Economic Review, (1993)
 

Contributions to Books

"Legal Issues: Indentification and Management," (with David Figuli and R. Claire Guthrie), Creating Careers Programs in a Liberal Arts Context (1987)
 

"Selecting Career Programs for Campuses,", Creating Career Programs in a Liberal Arts Context (1987)
 

Popular Press