Articles «Previous Next»

Link Rot: How the Inaccessibility of Electronic Citations Affects the Quality of New Zealand Scholarly Literature

Ailsa Parker, Whitireia Community Polytechnic

Abstract

“Link rot” or the decay of a URL as a result of removal of its website, content change or redirection, is recognised as a major problem in a variety of information retrieval areas. Library catalogues, distance learning resources and reference lists within scholarly literature are all affected. Within reference lists of scholarly articles, various trends have been researched and identified. An increase in the use of electronic citations has been paralleled by the decay of their links. Rates of decay vary within specific disciplines and electronic domains, and most researchers express concern at the resultant impact on one of the foundations of scholarly research. This New Zealand research investigates citation trends within six New Zealand journals in different disciplines between 2002–2005. Reasons for the failure to connect to sites are analysed in terms of Eppler’s (2003) information model of deficit responsibility and results compared with overseas studies. Suggestions are then made as to how electronic citations could be stabilised and to future areas of research.

Suggested Citation

Ailsa Parker. "Link Rot: How the Inaccessibility of Electronic Citations Affects the Quality of New Zealand Scholarly Literature" Library Journal Articles (2009).

This document is currently not available here.

Share